Category Archives: My Favourite Things

Hannah Gadsby

Original article here.

 

We only have an existing narrative framework for a stranger doing violence to you.”

 

The idea of “stranger danger” persists in the collective psyche, but we now know that sexual offences against children are the crimes least likely to involve strangers. Most children will be abused by opportunists in adult relationships: the married relatives, the family friends, the pillars of the community, the good blokes. “A lot of people who have experienced trauma at the hands of people they’ve trusted take responsibility, and that is what’s toxic,” Gadsby says.

“Shame has its place,” she says. “Shame is what you do to a kid to stop them running on the road. And then you take the shame away and immediately they’re back in the fold. You should never soak anybody in shame. It’s the prolonged existence of shame that then flips out into destructive rage. We can’t exist in that. It’s like treacle.”

The burden of talking about complex issues usually comes down to the most marginalised people. On the rare occasions that a white, heterosexual man steps up – Louis CK pointing out, for example, that “there is no greater threat to women than men” – they are hailed as heroes.

“A joke is a wank, but a story is intimacy,” she says.

It wasn’t until she was in her late 20s, around 2006, that she tried her hand at comedy, and she credits the newfound creativity with saving her life. “Comedy is great in that it’s accessible to someone like me, from a low socioeconomic background, struggling in life. The gatekeepers are a lot stronger in other art forms.”

“He’s obviously an unwell kid and there’s a lot of that in comedy,” says Gadsby. “It’s often young men trialling their philosophies on life, and we’ve got a generation of young men who believe that they are victimised, because they’ve been promised the world. That’s a poisoned chalice, because now there’s a gap between what the cultural narrative is and what their experience is. Looking back, I think it’s done me more good than harm to be promised absolutely nothing. I was always told I didn’t matter to the world, but the world still matters to me. That’s why I haven’t responded to the more brutal aspects of my life with violence or bitterness.”

 

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Tune: Papaya ‘Cosas fascinantes y sencillas’

Papaya ‘Cosas fascinantes y sencillas’

Invítame a cenar a un sitio nuevo,

donde podamos enlazar palabras sin freno.

 

Que cosas fascinantes y tan sencillas como la vida misma,

no me quiero enamorar.

No es que el amor me parezca ridículo, no,

es que ya no lo quiero ahora.

Ya me cansé de todas esas locuras,

si lo hacemos que sea a oscuras,

no me quiero enamorar.

 

Y te es mas fácil volverte solo a casa

y aunque no esté hecha la cama

y sin nadie a quien despertar.

Y te es mas fácil volverte solo a casa

y aunque no esté hecha la cama

y sin nadie a quien despertar

ya me cansé

de todas esas locuras,

si lo hacemos que sea a oscuras,

no me quiero enamorar

 

y hay misterios que nunca entiende nadie

y la tristeza se hace grande hasta poderte pisar.

Lasagne, Epicurious

Delicious winter warmer! Original recipe here.

INGREDIENTS

  1. Béchamel sauce:
    • 2 1/2 cups whole milk
    • 1 Turkish bay leaf
    • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) unsalted butter [152g]
    • 1/4 cup all purpose flour
    • 1/2 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon (scant) ground nutmeg
    • Pinch of ground cloves
  2. Swiss chard and mushroom layers:
    • 1 pound Swiss chard, center rib and stem cut from each leaf
    • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
    • 1 1/3 cups chopped onion
    • 4 large garlic cloves, chopped, divided
    • 1/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
    • Coarse kosher salt
    • 1 pound crimini mushrooms, sliced [I used normal ones]
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  3. Lasagna:
    • 9 7 x 3-inch lasagna noodles
    • Extra-virgin olive oil
    • 1 15-ounce container whole-milk ricotta cheese (preferably organic), divided [omitted this]
    • 6 ounces Italian Fontina Cheese, coarsely grated (about 1 1/2 cups packed), divided [omitted this]
    • 8 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan cheese, divided
    • Test-kitchen tip: To test for doneness, insert the blade of a small knife deep into the center of the lasagna for 30 seconds. remove the knife and feel the blade. If it’s hot, so is the lasagna.

PREPARATION

  1. For béchamel sauce:
    1. Bring milk and bay leaf to simmer in medium saucepan; remove from heat. Melt butter in heavy large saucepan over medium-low heat. Add flour and whisk to blend. Cook 2 minutes, whisking almost constantly (do not let roux brown). Gradually whisk milk with bay leaf into roux. Add 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt, nutmeg, and cloves and bring to simmer. Cook until sauce thickens enough to coat spoon, whisking often, about 3 minutes. Remove bay leaf. DO AHEAD: Béchamel sauce can be made 1 day ahead. Press plastic wrap directly onto surface and chill. Remove plastic and rewarm sauce before using, whisking to smooth.
  2. For swiss chard and mushroom layers:
    1. Blanch chard in large pot of boiling salted water 1 minute. Drain, pressing out all water, then chop coarsely. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in heavy medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion, half of garlic, and crushed red pepper. Sauté until onion is tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Mix in chard and season to taste with coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper.
    2. Heat remaining 2 tablespoons oil in heavy large nonstick skillet over medium- high heat. Add mushrooms and remaining garlic. Sauté until mushrooms are brown and tender, 7 to 8 minutes. Mix in nutmeg and season with coarse salt and pepper.
  3. For lasagna:
    1. Cook noodles in medium pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite, stirring occasionally. Drain; arrange noodles in single layer on sheet of plastic wrap.
    2. Brush 13 x 9 x 2-inch glass baking dish with oil to coat. Spread 3 tablespoons béchamel sauce thinly over bottom of dish. Arrange 3 noodles in dish to cover bottom (2 side by side lengthwise, then 1 crosswise). Spread half of chard mixture over pasta, then half of mushrooms. Drop half of ricotta over in dollops and spread in even layer. Sprinkle with half of Fontina, then 4 tablespoons Parmesan; spread 3/4 cup béchamel over. Repeat layering with 3 noodles, remaining chard, mushrooms, ricotta, Fontina, Parmesan, and 3/4 cup béchamel. Cover with 3 noodles and remaining béchamel. DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 hours ahead. Cover with foil. Let stand at room temperature.
    3. Preheat oven to 400°F. Bake lasagna covered 30 minutes. Uncover and bake until heated through and top is golden brown, 20 to 30 minutes longer. Let stand 15 minutes before serving.

Pieles – Film

Watch online here.

The film is about people who are disfigured in some way, and their search for romantic love.

I can’t say watching this film was a comfortable experience. I loved the colours and the dialogue, as well as the cinematography. Without giving too much away, I can see why it is incredibly controversial. I found the opening scene incredibly shocking, seeing as it is about a paedophile who goes to sleep with a child prostitute. “There are some people in this world who are made to suffer”, the madame consoles him, while he cries.

 

 

 

 

Get Out – Film

A great balance of horror and humour. An award winning screenplay.

White people “admiring” black bodies and consuming them like commodities.

Screen Shot 2018-03-25 at 15.21.22.png

Watch here.

Awards:

90th Academy Awards 

-won Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay

-Nominated for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actor (for Kaluuya)

23rd Critics’ Choice Awards

-5 nominations

75th Golden Globe Awards (nominations)

-Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy and

-Best Actor – Comedy or Musical for Kaluuya

71st British Academy Film Awards (nominations)

-Best Actor in a Leading Role for Kaluuya

-Best Original Screenplay

Status Anxiety

 

Emotional rewards have been pegged to status symbols.

People want love, so they buy Ferraris.

What if you fail when people tell you that anyone can do it?

Now we’re told that our societies are meritocracies. If those at the top deserve it, those at the bottom do too. Poverty seems deserved.

Suicide rates rise exponentially when societies join the modern world.

Treat no one as if they entirely deserve to be where they are, not even yourself.

Define your own success.

Refuse to let your outer achievements define your inner life.